Management of genital chlamydia trachomatis infection

Guideline No. 109
ISBN 978 1 905813 44 5
March 2009

The full guideline and quick reference guide are available to download in Adobe Acrobat format (info)

BACKGROUND

Chlamydia trachomatis is the most prevalent bacterial sexually transmitted infection in Scotland with 17,928 cases of chlamydial infection diagnosed in 2007, a 45% rise since 2002.

The majority of men and women with chlamydial infection are asymptomatic. Genital chlamydial infection can cause significant short and long term morbidity with accompanying costs to the individual and the health service.

WHY WE NEED A GUIDELINE

The guideline aims to advise on policy for the most cost-effective testing strategy at a population level and to consolidate best practice in the management of individual cases of diagnosed genital chlamydial
infection. This guideline updates SIGN 42, published in 2000, to reflect the most recent evidence.

THE CHALLENGE FOR HEALTHCARE PRACTITIONERS

To target testing at individuals belonging to groups with the highest prevalence of infection

REMIT

This guideline covers chlamydial infection of the genital tract and rectum. The guideline provides background information, recommendations and discussion on:

SIGN 109 addresses topics not covered in the previous guideline (SIGN 42), including:

POTENTIAL USERS

This guideline will be of particular interest to primary care practitioners, patients, people at risk of infection, charities and voluntary organisations
with an interest in sexual health, microbiologists, pharmacists, medical and nursing specialists in sexual health, medical and nursing specialists in
genitourinary medicine (GUM), gynaecologists, sexual health advisers, public health specialists, and academic researchers.